Home

White Out – a new story project about a man and his brain.

What happens when your brain mutinies? You want to move but you’re frozen.  The signal is not getting through.

Made in collaboration with clinicians, scientists, and patients at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, White Out explores one man’s journey through treatment for advanced Parkinson’s with Deep Brain Stimulation.

Drawing on shared language around mapping and the sea, the exhibition mixes clinical, research, and personal perspectives using a range of drawn, photographic and digital techniques to capture something of the complexities of neurological illness.

news

Come and see the show!

Come and see! The project is on show at the SGDP Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry from 13th May until 10th July Opening 5 – 7pm 13th May – all welcome! RSVP here

About

Programming, monoprint Martha Orbach

Deep Brain Stimulation involves surgery to implant very fine wires, with electrodes at their tips, deep into the brain. These are connected to a pulse generator (a device like a pacemaker), which is placed under the skin around the chest.

It is more than an operation – it is a lifelong therapy, where a positive outcome requires a meticulous approach to surgery combined with regular optimisation of medication and stimulation parameters in the years that follow.

For the team this is an opperation they do frequently. For patients it can feel like their one chance to regain quality of life in the face of a highly debilitating, incurable, neurological condition.

White Out explores human frailty and hi-tech precision, a subjective, emotive perspective in parallel with current clinical practice, to create a delicate depiction of a man trying to keep track of the line between himself and his symptoms.

With thanks to:

The Functional Neurosurgery Team at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery: particularly Professor Marwan Hariz, Professor Patricia Limousin, Professor Ludvic Zrinzo, Professor Tom Foltynie, Associate Professor Harith Akram, Specialist DBS Nurses: Maricel Salazar, Joseph Candelario-Mckeown, and Catherine Milabo, Linda Taib; Parkinson’s UK: particularly Claire Bale and Bob Taylor; Ian and Debs Frizell, Tim Andrews, Emma Sutton, Nicholas Clements, Richard Collins and Flic Eden, Rosie Holtom, Joe Dunthorne, Ben Brockett, Fay Ballard, Nick Kaplony, Sally Waterman, Rosy Martin, Jane Wildgoose, Judy Goldhill, Francesca Alberry, Julian Orbach, Enrico Tubaldi, Catherine Orbach, Photofusion, Street Level Photoworks: particularly Lachlan Young, UCLH Arts in Health: particularly Guy Noble, UCLH Charity, and everyone who shared their stories.

The project was created in collaboration with Dr Simon Little, funded by Arts Council England, and a team of helpers, and supported by Parkinson’s UK.

Blog